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Apple Watch Looks Cool, Lacks Compelling Use Cases for Salespeople

by Robert Desisto  |  March 9, 2015  |  6 Comments

In the past few weeks, CRM vendors have been very quick to show me their latest Watch demos. Although the demos look cool, I question if there is any real compelling use cases for salespeople. I could see alerts being important but the idea of a salesperson reading email, checking the status of sales opportunities, or trying to navigate some report in a screen a little bigger than a quarter seems like a stretch. Especially when the Apple Watch still requires you to have an iPhone, and if salespeople have an iPhone on their possession why wouldn’t they just use it.

I know many of us didn’t see the possible uses of the iPhone and iPad when they were initially launched but there were at least obvious use cases (email, contacts, maps, texting, browsing the web, etc) for mobile salespeople.   I am not saying consumers in general will not buy the Apple Watch. For example, I am intrigued on how the Apple Watch will support my iPhone running app, Runkeeper. It would be nice just to check my wrist to see distance traveled and mile splits, and possibly measure my heart rate (I know a Garmin could do this now).  There will also will be consumer apps that will emerge that are cool and drive adoption.  I just don’t see salespeople rushing to buy Apple Watches to help them sell to customers.

If you can think of compelling use cases for salespeople or sales managers would love to hear them.

Category: mobile-sales  

Tags: apple-apple-watch-mobile-sales  

Robert P. Desisto
VP Distinguished Analyst
14 years at Gartner
24 years IT industry

Robert Desisto is a Vice President and Distinguished Analyst in Gartner Research. He is responsible for managing the software as a service (SaaS) research agenda. His research focuses primarily on the use of SaaS as a delivery model for applications. Read Full Bio


Thoughts on Apple Watch Looks Cool, Lacks Compelling Use Cases for Salespeople


  1. Stacy D'Amico says:

    Thank you, Rob, you just saved me $17K. 😉 I owe you an email. Talk soon!

  2. Adam Honig says:

    Hi Rob,

    There is a use case that I can imagine but it might not be feasible at the moment.

    If the watch can monitor heart rate and other vital signs perhaps it could give the salesman real time feedback on how he’s doing on a call or in a meeting.

    “Rob, you’re going a bit too fast for this prospect,” it might alert you.

    I believe the watch can also be listening for Siri commands. Perhaps this can also be used for coaching or guidance.

    No doubt this is very scifi stuff for today’s apps and hardware, but I imagine it will be there one day.

    Adam

  3. Evan Hoffman says:

    Hi Rob, I agree with your post. As a sales pro, I don’t see an application besides looking “tech forward” when my customer sees it on my wrist. It would be a good icebreaker! But certainly, wouldn’t be the driver of a sale.

  4. Here’s a use case… “if you buy what I am selling today, I’ll give you this shiny plastic thing I am wearing on my wrist.” :)

  5. Wendey Sykora says:

    Rob,
    While I agree with your post – lacking compelling use cases for a sales professional – I will in fact be purchasing one myself due to the recent partnership between Dexcom (a continuous glucose monitor) and Apple. The FDA finally made this partnership possible in January with the downgrade in stringent controls on these types of applications. I wear a Dexcom monitor on my person and have had to carry a separate device to monitor my blood sugar levels. I need to glance at this device every few minutes! I will now be able to glance down at my Apple watch instead to get the same information. Use case for 3 million type 1 insulin dependent diabetics!

  6. […] to hit back at the Apple Watch and its potential business use cases. They thought that the “Apple Watch Looks Cool, Lacks Compelling Use Cases for Salespeople”. Their point being, no salesperson is going to use the watch with a CRM like Salesforce. This is […]



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