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Gartner Expands Its Definition of Customer Experience Management (CXM)

By Augie Ray | April 09, 2021 | 0 Comments

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Every now and then, there comes a time to recognize that the world has changed. My peers and I at Gartner spent several months discussing, debating, and building consensus for a change to our definition of customer experience management (CXM). Given the increase in investment in and the growing maturity of CXM programs, we felt the time had come to advance and expand our definition.

Our existing definition was, “The practice of designing and reacting to customer interactions in order to lift satisfaction, loyalty, and advocacy.”

Our new definition of CXM isn’t quite so succinct but does more to promote the scope, goals, and scale of enterprise-wide CXM efforts:

“CXM is the discipline of understanding customers and deploying strategic plans that enable cross-functional efforts and customer-centric culture to improve satisfaction, loyalty, and advocacy.”

Our existing definition of CXM, which was over a decade old, didn’t capture how the practice of CXM has evolved. We have observed many changes in how our clients approach and accomplish CXM, and these include:

  • Customer understanding: You can’t design and deploy a great customer experience (CX) until you know, listen to, and understand your customers. Much of what makes CXM successful in great companies isn’t about the projects they execute or the customer-facing tech they implement–it’s about how they gather, analyze, and disseminate customer understanding.
  • Repeatable and ongoing discipline: Gartner’s former definition called CXM a “practice,” which is a habit or the application of an idea. That word didn’t convey how CXM has become a constant, vital commitment firms make to improve their customer experience. CXM isn’t a project, mindset, tool, or process. It’s a discipline–a living, evolving, repeatable and ongoing set of capabilities that demands continuous investment, requires a system of governance, and delivers measurable outcomes.
  • Enterprise-wide strategy and collaboration: Our old definition did not reflect the scope that CXM requires to be successful. While one individual or team may have positive customer-centric practices that lead to CX improvement, a successful CXM program must inform, establish and scale these efforts across the entire organization.
  • Customer-Centric Culture: Finally, while the former definition put the focus on a CX outcome, our new definition recognizes that CXM leaders must enable change within their organization. You cannot achieve the desired goal of constantly improving CX throughout your customers’ end-to-end journey unless you affect how the organization works.  A strong CXM leader doesn’t merely oversee individual projects that positively impact customer satisfaction, loyalty, and advocacy; they must influence everyone within the organization to change how they work in a way that results in improved customer satisfaction, loyalty, and advocacy.

Our new CXM definition aligns with Gartner’s CX maturity framework. By design, it is intended to reflect the nine elements of CX maturity (voice of the customer, customer research, personas and journeys, strategy, technology, roles and governance, customer-centric culture, purpose, and metrics). If you’re a Gartner client, you can learn more about the revised CXM definition, how it can help bring consistency to the understanding of CXM in your organizations, and how to mature your CXM programs by reading “Use Gartner’s New Definition of Customer Experience Management to Align to CX Scope and Goals.”

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