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It’s Still True: Gartner Opinion is Not for Sale

October 8th, 2009 · 6 Comments

It almost sounds like a joke, except we’ve heard it more than once. Here it is: a number of vendors have told their prospects that Gartner charges vendors to be covered in its research. I’ve even heard specific amounts of up to $100,000 being claimed. Quite simply, if this were true Gartner would not be in business today. I blogged about this six months ago (http://tinyurl.com/cdzgvr) so I’m not going to repeat what I said here, but the point hasn’t changed: All Gartner analysts are strictly governed by our Code of Ethics (http://tinyurl.com/yfkyc7o) to ensure our research is independent and objective.
 
Anyone, client or not, user or vendor, can come forward if they think Gartner has published content that is inaccurate or misleading, or demonstrates bias or unfair treatment. The Office of the Ombudsman was established over five years ago to handle these very issues. If you’ve got one of these issues, please call us at +1 203 316 3334 or send us an email at ombudsman@gartner.com. We’ll be sure to get back to you.

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6 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Tweets that mention It’s Still True: Gartner Opinion is Not for Sale -- Topsy.com // Oct 8, 2009 at 5:31 pm

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  • 2 Jane Adams // Oct 8, 2009 at 10:28 pm

    Here it is: a number of vendors have told their prospects that Gartner charges vendors to be covered in its research.

    ** Ok well this is definitely the case. Here is how it works (I have seen this first hand). First, in most cases, you need to be a Gartner client in order to get “face time” with an analyst. Otherwise you may never get the chance to speak to an analyst. And if you do, it is very limited and are then told “oh you may get a call from a Gartner sales guy to sponsor some event. Make sure you do something”. Again, I have definitely seen this first hand.

    Quite simply, if this were true Gartner would not be in business today.

    ** You are in business because of this. Vendors pay through the nose for events, sponsored reports and more. Please don’t kid yourself. You are not the NYTimes where you are writing articles with the hopes of getting ad revenues.

    Believe me — ANY vendor reading this post — hopefully it makes an appearance — will agree.

    The Office of the Ombudsman was established over five years ago to handle these very issues.

    ** Finally, I dont think ANY vendor will report this to the Ombudsman. The last thing any paying vendor would want is to be on the crap list of an analyst that will write negative reports.

    Sorry, but I have no faith in what you are selling here!!

  • 3 Nancy Erskine // Oct 9, 2009 at 9:47 am

    Sorry you feel that way, Jane. But not everyone agrees with you. My team handles about 100 issues a month. Not all are escalations from vendors, but enough are to show that some vendors think the process works.

    There is absolutely a way to get facetime with analysts without being a client of Gartner, via vendor briefings: http://tinyurl.com/yzv9o3q.
    Vendors with a compelling story to tell, targeting the right areas, use briefings to make sure Gartner analysts know about their products and services. That’s why Gartner schedules 11,000 vendor briefings a year (that’s right, 11,000). You don’t need to be a client to request one.

    Nancy

  • 4 John Honovich // Oct 9, 2009 at 9:11 pm

    To eliminate any concerns about vendor bias, how about Gartner eliminate consulting contracts and payments from vendors?

    I assume this is a naive question.

    However, such a move would provide the strongest possible financial incentivements and align with end users interest.

  • 5 Carter Lusher // Oct 13, 2009 at 12:37 pm

    One way around the perception issue and to ensure that sales representatives do not imply that vendors have to pay-to-play is for Gartner, and other firms, to adopt a “Bill of Rights for Vendors.” This Bill of Rights for Vendors would clearly state that vendors do not have to be client to brief the analysts or pay to be included in research. The analyst firm sales representative would be required to discuss the Bill of Rights with every vendor they meet with and provide a copy personally signed and dated by the sales representative.

    To ensure the credibility of a Bill of Rights for Vendors, analyst firms would have to deal harshly with any employees that violates the policy.

    We are starting a process to collect analyst ecosystem on creating a standard “Bill of Rights for Vendors” that all analyst firms and vendors can use. To contribute to the development of this standard please visit:

    http://sagecircle.wordpress.com/2009/10/13/bill-of-rights-for-industry-analyst-vendor-prospects/

  • 6 Alex // Dec 1, 2009 at 9:50 am

    I completely agree with Jane Adams. The only way you can get time with these analyst is by paying. There is no way they will cover you if you are not paying, maybe you will get listed in some corner.

    Nancy – No one cares about the form.

    In my opinion, these analyst firms will soon be irrelevant. These analysts talk to customers and then summarize them and sell it to each one of them. With todays communities, if CIO, CTOs, and IT Managers or App Developers can talk to each other directly need them.
    This may not be true today, with people losing faith in the current system, the end is not far.