Mark Raskino

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Mark Raskino
VP & Gartner Fellow
12 years at Gartner
27 years IT industry

Mark Raskino is a vice president and Gartner Fellow in the Executive Leadership and Innovation group of Gartner Research. Mark researches CEO priorities and attitudes to IT and major business technology trendsRead Full Bio

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Spanish hopes, fears and technology

by Mark Raskino  |  June 4, 2013  |  1 Comment

Last week  I spent a couple of excellent days in Madrid and Barcelona. In my conversations with people, I was quickly reminded that this is a country in deep and continuing economic trouble.  Some told me of their concerns that a whole generation of young people would give up on the country and simply leave. Certainly headline youth unemployment rates  are eye-watering and there are many good graduates who cannot find work. I recalled a conversation I had with the young man monitoring the door at one of my presentation sessions at Symposium last year.  He had a first class degree in industrial design, yet in the city of Gaudi’s great inspirational works, he was doing a temping job swiping attendee badges. He told me he felt certain he would have to emigrate within the EU.

However last week I also saw signs of true international greatness and technological hope.   In Madrid I met with a bank that is using  a team of “digital natives” – all 25 or under to drive new ideas for the future of banking.  After my evening presentation I briefly met a senior IT manager from one of the country’s biggest football teams. That club, like others of its kind, uses digital technologies to project its brand globally and attract fan revenues from all over the world.  My journey between the two cities was taken on a wonderful, gleaming high speed train that any country would be proud of – and the train was full of commuting professionals. I boarded using a QR code, self printed pass. Such modern infrastructure is the lifeblood of sustained economic growth.  When I presented my digital business research in Barcelona, it was on the campus of IESE business school – which is one of the world’s top universities for international MBAs and management education, alongside Associate Professor Evgeny Kaganer.  He explained his MIT Sloan published research on the “human cloud” – a wonderful perspective on the future of work and employment models.

Overall – I came away with more feelings of hope than gloom.  I believe Spanish technology professionals and thinkers can make a huge difference in helping their country’s restoration to full economic health.

 

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  • 1 Davinia Siles   June 6, 2013 at 11:24 am

    Thank you for trust on us Marcos!

    Spain is a great country for leaving. There are sun, beaches, mountains, good health services; shops are open until late… The infrastructures in Spain are awesome, trains, planes, roads and busses; very much better than others countries of the European Union
    Personally, I more worried about the older people, sacked with a lot of family responsibilities and now considerate “too old” to work.
    There aren’t only a good business schools also we have well also there are very good vocational training but unknown. I am in software developer company.
    All engineering is very good there is the reason other countries are looking our people, but is a drama only a few Spanish really want to leave the country we are happy here.