Jenny Sussin

A member of the Gartner Blog Network

Jenny Sussin
Principal Research Analyst
2 years with Gartner
4 years IT industry

Jenny Sussin is a princial research analyst in the ITL Enterprise Software group of Gartner Research, with primary focus on social for CRM. Read Full Bio

Google Silently Silences Wildfire – Social CRM Pac-man Revisited

by Jenny Sussin  |  March 17, 2014  |  4 Comments

Pac-man likes to eat dots. It’s simple.

This is a story I’ve prefaced before on this blog:

So let’s do a Pac-man and Dot table for market re-cap thus far…

acquisitions

Keep in mind some of those big deals, were for the purchase of more than a social app, but a broader set of apps. Now, the argument could be made for something being more a dot or a sub-dot than a Pac-man, but we’re not here to argue those things. We’re here to see what has happened to these acquisitions, objectively. For the sake of including meat for dinner, let’s only talk about acquisitions that have marinated for nine months+ (I figure if it’s long enough to grow a baby, it’s long enough to make some progress.)

acquisitions2

woah

So what’s the point? It’s the same point we’ve been making for the last two years (seriously, look at the old blog posts.) Pac-man eats the dot and hopefully it uses it as the fuel needed to beat out the ghosts, aka competitors. Or in other situations, it’s the end user who has hunger pains after the acquisition.

 

 

 

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You’re Not Alone: The Rule of Three Helps Build Out Your Social Network

by Jenny Sussin  |  January 28, 2014  |  8 Comments

There are so many things about social media engagement that are deemed to simple to write about anymore. Well ladies and gentlemen, let’s get tacky!

Tacky, or weird?

 

I know people are struggling with developing their individual social networks and their organization’s social networks and so in my first blog post of 2014, let’s talk about one of those things that everyone is afraid to ask about: how to organically build out your social network. What do I mean by organic? I mean not buying followers, not following people in hopes that they’ll follow you back in a move of courtesy.

 

 

I mean gaining followers by genuinely being intriguing in the sense that Carnegie wanted to help us win friends and influence people.

 

You might say, “hey lady, you only have 1,800 followers.” And I might say, “I’m cool with that,” because for me, it’s okay to only have 1,800 followers. If 1,800 people are interested in what I have to say, that is enough pressure for an individual person. I’m not trying to sell anything via social media. I’m trying to meet and bond with cool people and for such an objective, a pot of 1,800 people ensures I am always amused.

 

But if your objective is a business objective – how do you even get to 1,800? Here is my rule of 3 for individuals and organizations looking to build out their social networks: for everyone one original post you create, you must retweet/share something someone else said, and comment on something someone else said. And here is why:

  • Create an original post because you want to show you have a mind – and that mind can come up with something unique. Maybe something unique is something about your business, maybe it is something you’re thinking of, the bottom line is this is your post to do what you want with.

  • Retweet or share to show you’re the kind of person who is willing to proliferate someone else’s message, if you think that message is a good one. This is the whole “you scratch my back, I scratch yours,” concept. We’re all a littler narcissistic folks. Pet an ego.

  • Comment on someone else’s post to engage with them. Building a real, meaningful network means you need to have a reciprocal feeling of relationship. So talk to the person! Start up a dialogue. Ask a question, make an observation. Encourage people to communicate with you, not at you. Set expectations that when someone enters into a relationship with you, you engage.

 

It’s quick, it’s easy, and now you don’t need to be embarrassed about asking. The truth is, we talk to clients about this a couple of times a week.

You don’t need to comment here if you don’t want to admit you looked at this – afterall, we are being tacky. But do, do me a favor: come find me at an upcoming event I’ll be at and let me know if you found this valuable. I promise not to rat you out :) Here is where I’ll be:

Business Intelligence & Analytics Summit, March 31 – April 2 in Las Vegas

Customer Strategies and Technologies Summit, April 28 – 29 in London

Portals, Content &  Collaboration Summit, May 5-7 in Los Angeles

Customer 360 Summit, May 19 – 21 in Orlando

 

 

 

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A Christmas Tale of Social Media App Acquisition

by Jenny Sussin  |  December 18, 2013  |  Comments Off

Almost 18 months back, I wrote a blog post on the pac-manning of the social application market. The big vendors were gobbling up the small vendors and trying to outsmart their competitors. Yadda, yadda, yadda, it hasn’t stopped. And so while the mega vendors cobble together their social offerings and the entrepreneurs stay on as GMs or leave to start new companies, the people left in the lurch are the customers.

I know this isn’t a new story. M&A has been around since the beginning of business-time and changes in business performance have been a result ever since.

So in the spirit of the holiday season, let me present a seasonal take: a Christmas tale for each of our three characters: the acquirer, the acquiree, and the customer.

 

The Acquirer. 

You are the modern day Santa Claus and you’ve earned it. What you’ve provided your customers over the years are gifts that help them keep their companies alive (and sometimes coal, but hey!) You’ve cobbled together a rag-tag bunch of reindeer to help you deliver your “gifts” via sleigh over the years but you’ve just found this new reindeer with a bright red nose to help light your way to a successful Christmas. As you bring this new reindeer, Rudolph, on board you need to keep one very important thing in mind. If you break Rudolph’s helpful, holiday spirit or if you are too busy teaching Rudolph how to guide your sleigh, to actually let him guide your sleigh, your customers who would ordinarily receive your gifts are going to be displeased and might stop believing in Santa Claus.

 

The Acquiree.

Rudolph with your nose so bright, everyone is going to want you to guide their sleigh tonight. At first the other reindeer laughed at you but the customers found you to be so interesting, useful, shiny and new that the other reindeer had to pay attention. Now Santa has courted you and you’re heading to the North Pole, the envy of all of your peers. Don’t forget it was the customers who got you there. You might have a shiny nose, but they figured out how to use it and they were so ecstatic about your nose that Santa took notice. When Santa brought you to the North Pole, you weren’t you anymore…and that is okay because you’re working toward a greater cause…but don’t lose emphasis on who helped you get where you are in an attempt to fit in or trump Santa’s other reindeer.

 

The Customer. 

Sorry bro, you’re just a kid and life is a nightmare. We can hope Santa does the right thing, but sometimes Santa is just in the bright-nose collection business and doesn’t recognize Rudolph for anything but his good looks. But if you’re patient and give Rudolph, Santa and the other reindeer time to get to know each other, you may get more gifts, better gifts, coordinated gifts with no repeats. The question you have to ask yourself is do you have the time to wait for that dream to become a reality or should you start looking for a new reindeer?

 

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The Twitter DM Change and Its Impact on Social Customer Engagement

by Jenny Sussin  |  October 18, 2013  |  1 Comment

There have been a lot of news articles and a lot of blog posts about Twitter’s change to it’s direct messaging rules – gist is, you can set your Twitter profile to allow people to direct message (DM) you even if you don’t follow them.

I’m not trying to repeat anything anyone has already said, so I’ll link to a couple of articles right now that will explain more if you want more:

Twitter Enables Direct Messages From All Your Followers: The Effect on Social Customer Service

Twitter’s Direct Messages, A Vehicle for Spam, No Longer Accepts Links

How Twitter’s New DM Will Impact Brand Marketing

Instead what I want to let our clients and readers of the Gartner blogs know that there are 5 quick things to keep in mind regarding this change and how it impacts your business.

This won’t stop customers from complaining publicly. People aren’t going to DM you instead of tweeting your transgressions out loud. That isn’t nearly as satisfying for them.

If someone complains publicly, you need to at a minimum begin your response publicly. If you need to take something to a DM or offline, you should, but you should also recognize that the Twittersphere doesn’t know you just called that menace @jsussin who complained about her lost luggage unless you tell them you’re going to call her.

You’re still going to need a multichannel customer service strategy. DMs don’t take the place of email and people will never view them as, as secure as email. And they’re not. You still need to work on that customer engagement center.

Individuals don’t need to open up their DM box to you, even though you open it up to them…but even if they do, don’t abuse it. Links aren’t the only thing you can send in a DM that can be spammy and you don’t want to get yourself a bad reputation, do you?

The DM should still be used lightly. In a world where we’re hell-bent on personalization, we’re going to want to send coupon codes and individualized messages to our customers. There are still times you want to shout from the rooftops that you love someone and propose to them on the jumbotron. He/she may still want to show off that affection to their friends. Keep that in mind.

And with that my friends, do your thing. If you have some more quick tips that you want to share, or if you have any comments or questions, use the comment thread!

 

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Social Business Plays Katniss Everdeen in the Enterprise Hunger Games

by Jenny Sussin  |  October 10, 2013  |  Comments Off

There’s nothing I love more than a good pop culture reference and it’s time we take our tweets and turn them into bows and arrows. (If you’re unfamiliar with The Hunger Games, you’re going to have a really hard time with this blog post.)

I have spent the last four days at Gartner’s US Symposium and in that time, I’ve taken 40+ 1:1 meetings where I’ve spoken with clients about social media and its application to their business. Coupled with around 300 clients inquiries I’ve taken on the topic thus far this year, that makes almost about 400 social media problems that just I, myself, have worked with businesses to troubleshoot. Keep in mind, I’m not the only person at Gartner who covers social business so if we extrapolate a bit I’d venture to guess that Gartner has taken between 2,000 and 3,000 inquiries on social business topics this year.

Yet market pundits try to say it’s become less important, having the staying power of District 11 in the Games. CIOs look for reasons why social media is irrelevant to their company in an attempt to prioritize Districts 1 and 2. So why does the underfunded, undernourished District 12, Katniss Everdeen, continue to be a force of such impact that the Capitol is forced to pay attention?

You have to consider what the Capitol wants. They’re comfortable with what they know, what they can control, traditional strategy, traditional approaches, and traditional technologies. Katniss/Social represents all that the Capitol has neglected: essentially customer and employee feedback…for years.

And once we empower Katniss, give her the bows and arrows she needs to thrive, allow her to tweet or blog or post to the Web and be seen by all of Panem, she becomes dangerous. She becomes something we can no longer control because we’ve never spent the time to nurture her strengths and teach her where to aim the arrows.

This is where the enterprise still has a chance. The enterprise needs to stop ignoring social, stop trying to repress it, and instead embrace it and give it a target. If the Capitol can channel Katniss and get her fighting for their cause, a real business impact, then it gets its power back. But as those who’ve read the books know the fate of the Capitol, they can only hope enterprises see a better fate.

*The grammatical errors in this blog post are gratuitous.

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The “SMMS” Misnomer – And Why It Drives Me Up A Wall

by Jenny Sussin  |  September 6, 2013  |  2 Comments

SMMS supposedly stands for social media management system. I’ve said it once, and I will say it again – there is no such thing as social media management system.

Using the term “SMMS” proliferates the complete misconception that businesses work with one application versus the, at minimum, 3 to 5 they’re actually working with. I’ve spoken with companies using at least 8 different social media applications to support CRM – and this isn’t rare! There is not one all-in-one application in the market right now. How could there be?! Is there one “Customer” team in an organization? That customer team does marketing, customer service and sales from within the same reporting structure? They all use the same legacy application to do their day-to-day jobs? So how could there be one social solution to plug into one tool which, quite frankly, doesn’t exist.

It’s the same problem that has happened with the word, “social.” Sure we’re collectively moving past the hump, but you know how many people still confusedly think all “social” is the same thing? Do you know how many people parallel Radian 6 with Facebook? It’s scary and yet, it isn’t their fault. It’s the market’s fault for feeding into a hyped up misnomer and not clarifying which aspect of “social” they meant. Everyone just wanted to fit in – but that led end user organizations into this giant jumble of a world where HootSuite, Yammer, and Bazaarvoice are on the same shortlist.

Social solutions are not just social solutions, they’re solutions which complement a business process. Social solutions for marketing, social solutions for customer service, social solutions for sales, etc. So sure, if you want to #smms you can go for it, I’m not stopping you. At least do me a solid and say what you’re actually looking at, purpose wise, when it comes to “managing” social media.

 

Gartner clients, we’ve got a reading list for you:

There Is No Social Media Management System

The Preposition Makes All the Difference When You Go From Social CRM to Social For CRM

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Why I’m So Crazy About LinkedIn…And You Should Be Too

by Jenny Sussin  |  July 9, 2013  |  19 Comments

By this point, everyone has seen the donut analogy regarding what social networks are used for what.

Facebook – I like donuts

Twitter – I am eating a donut

LinkedIn – My skills include: donut eating

Pinterest – Here is a recipe for a donut

Foursquare – This is where I eat donuts

The creators and the audience of this analogy find it witty and interesting because there is a difference between social networks, and there is a difference in how you conduct yourself on each network. For an example, we can use what I do personally:

Facebook – I “friend” my friends, classmates, family and co-workers who I talk about things other than work with

Twitter – I “follow” friends, comedians, colleagues, industry experts, companies, news outlets, and anyone or anything else that interests me with no expectation they will follow me back

LinkedIn – I “connect” with friends, classmates, family, co-workers, clients and anyone I can personally or professionally vouch for – good or bad

Pinterest – I “follow” friends from Facebook with interesting pins, cooking magazines, DIY-ers

Foursquare – I “friend” people who are local, and people I’m uncomfortable turning down, but people I know

The faux verbs: to “friend”, to “follow” and to “connect,” all carry weight. But there is even more weight in the verbs, the actions you can take, once you’ve looped someone into your network on these sites.

So why bring this up now? The other day I had turned down four LinkedIn connection requests, all from people I didn’t know. One was even someone from Gartner who I just haven’t ever worked with. Anyway, I took to Twitter, as I tend to do when this sort of thing happens, and I said something along the lines of “if I don’t know you, don’t bother requesting to connect with me on LinkedIn. The answer is no.” Nice and obnoxious, but you can see the frustration, me having repeated this time and time again. Last night I got a tweet back asking, “don’t you see the value in connecting with people and broadening your network?”

OF COURSE I DO! But LinkedIn isn’t the place for that: it’s all in the verbs.

On LinkedIn you’re asked to “introduce” connections to one another, “recommend” connections, and “endorse” connections. How can I possibly introduce one person to another if I haven’t met either of them myself? How can I recommend someone for a position when I have no idea who they are? How can I endorse a person when the only thing I know about them is they have the search skills to find me on LinkedIn? If you were hiring someone and came to me asking about one of these people and I made this face…

…who looks stupid?

If I were to “connect” with every stranger (because even an introductory message via InMail still makes us strangers,) then it would ruin the integrity of my word as it pertains to my entire LinkedIn connections network, which then benefits no one. Each social network needs to be recognized what it is, and businesses aren’t the only ones guilty of social media faux pas. It’s important that we as individual mind social cues and network verbs to keep the integrity of the sites many of us have grown to rely on intact.

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Your Video Got 100,000 Views? Mine Closed a $3 Millon Deal.

by Jenny Sussin  |  June 25, 2013  |  1 Comment

Every marketer makes the mistake of equating activity to value at some point in their career. You know what, it’s not just marketers: it’s everyone. “You left at 5:30? I work until 10 pm every night.”

The bottom line for the 10 pm people: if I can get similar or better quality work done by 5:30, I’m not working until 10.

When I was an entry level marketer focusing on social media, I had some really strong mentors who taught me how to create content that wasn’t boring. They helped me see that even though I was marketing B2B software, I could make the content interesting versus just having the ‘talking head’ videos that we’re all too familiar with. I was proud of myself. I was getting content created with little to no-budget that was garnering an audience of hundreds, or if I was lucky it’d get thousands, and for one product line of a non-consumer brand, that level of activity around content is not something to be scoffed at.

I also had a higher-level, executive mentor. He was this really well-respected, smart, hilarious man in the company who scared the ____ out of me and everyone who worked for him or around him. (Side note: being able to make people laugh until they cry, and at the same time have them genuinely fear you, is a legitimate skill. I’m still in awe of this person as you can see.)

So one day I was working from my former company’s headquarters and he calls me over the catch up. I was so proud of the work I’d done and as I told him about the content I’d created and the low-budget with high viewership, I was sure I was impressing him. I wasn’t. Instead he hit me with some business knowledge and took me down a peg. He asked, “so how many prospects were you able to pin point?” And I said, “well, none but…” And so he asked, “were you able to close any deals as a result of this?” And I said, “No but this cost us next to nothing and has thousands of views!” And he said, “we made a video the other day for $40,000. It has 30 views, but we closed a $3 million deal as a result of it. The ‘talking head’ helped us close a deal with his company.”

Duh. Duh, duh, duh, duh, duh. When you work in the social space, you end up getting so consumed with being creative and getting ‘hits’ that you often lose track of your true business purpose: make us money or save us money, either directly or indirectly. You can literally pay for ‘activity.’ $39 will get you 5,000 views on your YouTube video thanks to Socialkik.

When you’re building your social media strategy, including your social content strategy, consider your end game and act accordingly versus 2009 Jenny.

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For the Interns: The Duck Face (and a quick tip for posting to social media)

by Jenny Sussin  |  May 31, 2013  |  1 Comment

Music for today’s reading:

Another post in preparation for intern and I-need-to-find-a-job season…we bring you “the duck face…”

You know what I mean you iPhone users, you MySpace reformers, you Instagrammers…

One more from the little Kardashian…

Heck, my one colleague and I were just talking about how his teenager has started making the duck face and throwing down 2s (a sideways peace sign a la Drake, Charlize and little K) for the last couple of months now since she’s discovered how to take an iPhone selfie (you need long enough arms to make this work, it usually takes until 14 or so.)

No one wants to employ a duck face. Especially not one with a spray tan and a beer bottle in hand.

You’ve got to keep in mind young’ns and older folk that anything you put online, can and will be found: just ask Anthony Weiner.

So here is the simplest of advice for anyone raising a teenager, getting tipsy on the weekend, tweeting or posting to social media either personally or on behalf of their company…if you’re not okay with your post, with a giant picture of your face next to it, up on a billboard along the I-95 corridor or the 101 or wherever you are: DON’T POST IT.

You can not simply delete something from social media. Thousands of companies are capturing those feeds every second of every day and so while you think you have deleted something from Twitter or Facebook, someone else already has a copy of it. Not just one someone, hundreds of thousands of someones. Be smart. Hide your phone and your face when you’re under the influence.

Take a breather when you’re frustrated before posting something on social media.

And companies, know how to manage control of your social media accounts so the duck face doesn’t happen or this, this is worse.

Direct messages aren’t private, just ask your local congressman.

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For the Interns: If You Give an Intern Control of Your Facebook Page…

by Jenny Sussin  |  May 16, 2013  |  Comments Off

Let’s press play and turn on the speakers for this one because it’s nearly summer time and while our interns come to join us, we should listen to some relaxing music. Plus, your intern might look like Chad or Jeremy in ’64.

 

If you give an intern control of your Facebook page, one or two or three of many things could happen. He/she might…

Feel empowered…

 

Feel confused…

 

Establish the customer-facing social media strategy you lack…

 

Get angry with you and post something inappropriate…

 

Build a foundation on which you can express your brand’s brand on social media…

 

Build a foundation for your brand that is not really your brand’s brand…

 

Flourish under your leadership and become a change agent and leader in your organization…

 

Go work for a competitor, while still having admin access to your Facebook page…

 

As intern season springs upon us and the doe-eyed young’ns enter our white-walled dwellings, let’s keep in mind that the tasks we assign them are tasks that have an impact on both the intern and the organization. When I was a wee intern, some of the folks at my former employer gave some of us a camera, they gave others the equipment to podcast, and others the opportunity to blog. That one day where someone believed in us and entrusted us to go out and express how we felt about the company we were working for changed our understanding of “career” and what we could do to impact a “stiff” organization.

But also keep in mind that these interns don’t know the history behind your brand. They don’t necessarily understand your industry and your competitors. They might not even understand your product. And worse, they will be gone at the end of the summer. Don’t have them start something you can’t carry on.

And with those few words of wisdom, everyone enjoy your summer :)

Let the music play out…

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