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Attacking the High Costs of Desktop Virtualization: Part 2

by Gunnar Berger  |  September 6, 2013  |  1 Comment

Understanding the difference between RDS and VDA licenses

I spent too much time this week digging into RDS and VDA. I shot a lot of videos had a lot of long conversations all because I once and for all wanted to understand licensing as it pertains to VDI. In the end… I still don’t 100% get it but I think I’m 90% of the way there. In any case here is a short video I did explaining the differences:

Why do you care about these differences? I think you should care because the per user licensing on RDS versus the per device license of VDA has a major gap in cost (depending on your environment of course). Considering I just wrote a lot of research on “Attacking the High Cost of Desktop Virtualization” lets just say this is a hot topic for me right now. This cost gap, along with the differences in SPLA licensing, is why we see Desktop as a Service (DaaS) providers offer Server OSs as a VDI solution. I’m actually starting to get behind this idea and see that it could be used internally or externally (DaaS). In any case, come 2014 I will be conducting some major research around this (for Gartner clients), regardless I hope you learned something from the video.


Category: sbc  shvd  vdi  

Tags: rds  vda  

Gunnar Berger
Research Director
1 year at Gartner
14 years IT industry

Gunnar Berger is a research director for Gartner's IT Professionals service. He covers desktop, application and server virtualization ...Read Full Bio

Thoughts on Attacking the High Costs of Desktop Virtualization: Part 2

  1. rubaiyat rahman says:

    Great video..really appriciate your efforts to make it simple to have idea on current licensing.


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