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People Are the “Killer App” of Social Software

by Gene Alvarez  |  July 21, 2010  |  1 Comment

After reading “Facebook, MySpace Get Failing Grade on Customer Satisfaction” in PC Magazine http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2366730,00.asp I started to think about what is it that I like or dislike about my favorite online community. What I discovered was the stickiness of my favorite online community was communication with people that I am interested me and that I wanted to stay in touch with them.

However because of this desire, I or we often put up with an ever changing and confusing user interface that is coupled with privacy settings that are cryptic and confusing. Moreover, when I do try and organize people into groups that task can take hours for existing friends. If fact when I polled some of my friends I found that some had simple created on profile for work and one for the rest of their real friends.

Yet I (and perhaps we) still returned to use the site. I found myself putting up with all shortcomings in order to stay connected. Now it could be that the cell phones may have altered my behavior as I have grown accustomed to hitting redial after a dropped call. Or could it be that PC software got me used to this because every fix involved a reboot of my PC. Or could it go as far back as electricity and the blow fuse. Who knows?

But perhaps it can be best represented in an equation (Alvarez’s Law, Axiom, or just a cool tweet).

Success is achieved for any technology that can create a desire to have, use or participate that is greater than the sum of all problems created whether these problems are known or unknown.

Category: web-and-crm  

Tags: online-communities  social  social-software  web-20  


Thoughts on People Are the “Killer App” of Social Software


  1. Jeffrey Mann says:

    When a new technology or product reaches the stage of being “merely annoying” it is successful. Converting file formats is usually annoying; Switching ERP systems is a major undertaking that goes way beyond annoying. Facebook is annoying, which is probably about as good as it can get.



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